Last woman convicted during Salem witch trials exonerated

More than 200 women and men in Salem were convicted of witchcraft in the 1690s. Eventually, 19...
More than 200 women and men in Salem were convicted of witchcraft in the 1690s. Eventually, 19 were hanged while four others died in prison.(The Everett Collection via Canva)
Published: Aug. 8, 2022 at 10:04 AM CDT
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(CNN) - It took more than 300 years, but the last woman convicted during the Salem witch trials has been exonerated.

The name of Elizabeth Johnson Jr. is now cleared, thanks to the effort of an area teacher and her eighth-grade civics class.

Johnson was accused of witchcraft in 1692, one of more than 200 other women and men in Salem. Eventually, 19 were hanged while four others died in prison.

Johnson was to be executed at age 22, but her life was spared by the governor at the time.

Teacher Carrie LaPierre took note of Johnson’s case after reading other accused names had been cleared but Johnson’s hadn’t.

Over the last few years, LaPierre’s eighth graders petitioned state lawmakers and just recently were successful in getting an amendment attached to the state budget.

The amendment adds Johnson’s name to an existing 1957 resolution that exonerates other “witches.”

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